The museum will be closed Tuesday July 27th.

 

Museum hours Tuesdays through Fridays 10am-4pm, 3rd Saturdays of the month will start September 2021.

 

 

Together We Are Strong

 


 

 

  

The Los Angeles Police Museum is looking for volunteers for assisting with administrative work, 2 days per week
 (6 hours per week). Please email info@lapolicemuseum.org for more information.

 

Donate To The LAPD Women’s Exhibit


 



The Keystone Call-Box


Standing before you on this Los Angeles City street is what used to be known as a Keystone Call-Box! While it now houses equipment for the Department of Water and Power that efficiently runs your neighborhood’s street lights, the intricately decorated pedestals and boxes were once used by your Los Angeles City Police and Fire Department for communications systems that linked the community to emergency services.

These devices were first known to be used in the early 1900’s. Firefighters responded to life threatening emergencies with just the pull of a handle. Police officers were able communicate with their station to respond to calls for service and request resources with just one phone call. After the “9-1-1” system was introduced to Los Angeles in the 1960’s, the Fire Department phased out use of the call box by the public. When radios and cell phones became more reliable in the 1990’s, the Police Department decommissioned the call boxes and rendered them extinct.

With the cooperation of Los Angeles Department of Water and Power, the Los Angeles Police Museum has restored and brought back the original colors of these intricate pieces of equipment. These century-old boxes still exist throughout Los Angeles today!

Warning!


Tampering and gaining access inside these boxes poses an electrical danger to you and your love ones that could cause serious injury! These boxes are heavily secured and opening them could cause the response of emergency services.

In addition, Penal Code 591 PC makes it a crime for a person to maliciously disconnect, remove, injure, or obstruct any telephone, cable, or electrical line, which include these boxes. Violation of this law is punishable by up to 3 years in jail.

Please appreciate these relics for what they are and do not attempt to open them.

Thank You!

 

Purchase your Historical Limited Edition LAPD 150th Anniversary Yearbook TODAY

Click here to purchase your yearbook now

Click here to purchase your yearbook now

Honoring our past, serving our future


The Los Angeles Police Museum is available for location rentals, including filming, parking lots rentals, community events for all ages and retirement parties. Please call (323) 344-9445 for rates and availability.

EXPLORE OUR EXHIBITS

Onion Field

The Onion Field is a 1973 nonfiction book by Joseph Wambaugh, a sergeant for the Los Angeles Police Department, chronicling the kidnapping of two plainclothes LAPD officers by a pair of criminals during a traffic stop and the subsequent murder of one of the officers.

The Shootout

The North Hollywood shootout was a confrontation between two heavily armed and armored bank robbers, Larry Phillips Jr. and Emil Mătăsăreanu, and members of the Los Angeles Police Department (LAPD) in the North Hollywood district of Los Angeles, California, on February 28, 1997. 

Board of Police Commissioners

The Board of Police Commissioners and the Police Department were established by the Los Angeles City Charter effective July 1, 1925. As head of the department, the Board of Police Commissioners sets policies, oversees department operations and works in conjunction with the Chief of Police, who acts as the chief executive officer and reports to the Board.

Adam-12

Adam-12″ debuted in the fall of 1968, bringing a vision of humanity and friendliness to the LAPD’s authoritative blue uniform. The show was created by Bob Cinader and driven by the creator of television’s “Dragnet”, Jack Webb. Kent McCord, who portrayed officer Jim Reed states that his fan base often echoes this simple yet profound sentiment: “I became a police officer because of you.

ABOUT THE MUSEUM

HOURS:  Tuesday – Friday, 10 a.m. – 4 p.m.; 3rd Saturday of the month, 9 a.m. – 3 p.m.

ADMISSION FEES: General (ages 13 to 61) $10.00; Seniors (62+) $9.00; Children (6-12) $5.00; Children (5 and under) Free; Members Free

The Los Angeles Police Museum is the nation’s preeminent museum dedicated to exploring and sharing the rich history of the Los Angeles Police Department (LAPD) through engaging exibits and rare timeless artifacts. Founded in 2001, it is our mission to collect, preserve, exhibit, and interpret the history of one of the most influential police departments in the nation.

Celebrate the LAPD's 150th Anniversary By Ordering YourAnniversary Yearbook today!

Explore more than 400 pages filled with color photography of LAPD personnel, geographic areas, specialized units, and a roll call of all living retirees who have shaped the Los Angeles Police Department over the last 150 years.

Memorial Wall!

Add your name to the memorial.

Make a Donation!

Contribute by donating money or an artifact.

Become a Member!

Join our community end enjoy special benefits.

Celebrate the LAPD's 150th Anniversary By Ordering YourAnniversary Yearbook today!

Explore more than 400 pages filled with color photography of LAPD personnel, geographic areas, specialized units, and a roll call of all living retirees who have shaped the Los Angeles Police Department over the last 150 years.

Memorial Wall!

Add your name to the memorial.

Make a Donation!

Contribute by donating money or an artifact.

Become a Member!

Join our community end enjoy special benefits.

THE HOT SHEET

Read the publication of the Los Angeles Police Museum.